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mhine magno
im simple and lovable person... never mind the age hahaha... it doesn't matter
i have passed my exam!!! LOL ….
my mom will surely proud of me…
==>MHINE

i have passed my exam!!! LOL ….

my mom will surely proud of me…

==>MHINE

Posted
2 years ago

WHAT IS BLOG??

What is blog without the sense of an article… it is not about the picture….

but it is about the sign it show or lessons it share..

Posted
2 years ago

MY ONLY LOVE…

While walking through a social site 2go
i collected a bright red rose
all the petals intact n sparkling
my lyf was hopeless n
engulfed in darkness
remorseful n full of regrets why the world was unfair
but the moment i sniffed the scent wit my eyes closed
i got new strength
i got new love i would stick to
i got true love in my heart
i got new hope that yes there is mo in life
the bright red rose had changed ma life


many roses always wither away
wen the season changes
but my bright red rose
never wither away
because it is deeply rooted in my heart.

my rose never fades

it keeps blossoming each and everyday
Tides n strong winds cam n go but my rose never break its stem

days have passed,
months have cam n gone
things r always changing
but wen am sucked out strength
i always snif the scent of my rose
when i nid love

i sniff my red bright rose
i love my rose alot

never wil i allow any petal
b plucked from my rose
never will i allow the sun drain out the water in my rose,

it is so precious n speacial
i love my bright red rose Damaris Njeri

mwaaaaah BABY


===> MHINE

Posted
2 years ago

My Unfinished First Love Story

It all started when I entered college, my old friend always makes fun at me in front of a very hot and silent type person who’s also a friend of her. I was inlove at first sight and at my surprise, that person was just right beside my room. So everytime i sit on my chair, i saw that person looking straight at me too. It feels like i’m melting down and heart beats faster. One day, when I checked out the calendar of my university I caught that person staring at me through the glass that protects the calendar. It was heart-pounding experience again. I wrote about that person in my diary wishing that something will happen on us.  I can’t bear my feelings anymore and I want to put it to action. But my intuition stops me and decided to hide it to my self waiting for our time to come. After all tre waiting, nothing’s happen until i reached second year college. I saw that person riding in a triyc inside with blunt eyes on me. I felt so hurt and sad.


=====> MHINE

Posted
2 years ago

The Language of a Relationship

One thing people feel they have free rein to constantly comment on, is what language I speak in my home and to my partner. The most common refrain is, ‘You are in Germany, you should speak German to each other’ and other variations on the theme. Frankly, I tend to feel telling me what language to speak to my partner is like me telling you how often you should be having sex with yours. It isn’t any of my business and it is entirely up to you two. But that is by the by. This isn’t about what pisses me off, but instead about a little theory I have regarding bilingual relationships.

Obviously, I speak English. I came to Germany with three words of German (and one of them was ‘hallo’ under my belt) and have spent the past eighteen months simultaneously teaching English, writing in English and learning a rather difficult language that, contrary to the popular refrain of ‘just speak it!’ requires a decent amount of grammatical comprehension prior to bursting into song (is it obvious people telling me how I should and shouldn’t learn irritates me?) SG speaks German and English, having learnt the latter at school from the age of 10 – nowadays it is 7 – and taking two courses as part of his tertiary education. So what language do we speak at home? What language does our relationship speak? English. Isn’t it shocking!

Yes, it is an ease thing. SG is far better at English than I am at German. It is easier for us to communicate in this language. But more than that, from the very beginning, we were instantly able to communicate in English. It was the language with which we got to know each other, the language that enabled our relationship to actually develop. I believe bilingual relationships have mother tongues and the mother tongue of a relationship is the one you both use/used for all the important things – for the first dates, the big conversations. That language is the one that is the closest to mutually comfortable. Perhaps the Spanish boy with the German girl speaks better German than she does Spanish, or perhaps they both speak excellent French – but one of the three languages will be the one that connected them; the relationship’s mother tongue.

I spoke to a friend of mine about this once. He is German, but lived and studied in Seoul. He met his girlfriend there, and the language they felt most comfortable communicating in, was English. And so it was English that they spoke. He said as much as they both said, ‘I really should teach you German’ or ‘I really should teach you Korean’ and despite the fact they were both living in Seoul, the language that connected them was English. That was their relationship’s mother tongue. And once that language has asserted itself, once that is your method of communication, it is very difficult to change it.

Some couples are equally as fluent in the same two languages. I have a friend who speaks, after thirteen years of studying it, terrific German. She and her German boyfriend alternate between English and German, depending on how they feel or who is more tired and less motivated to converse in their second language. But I would hazard a guess, out of both languages, there is one that, when push comes to shove, would be the chosen language to really connect with, to make themselves understood within their personal dynamic.

In our house, we speak both German and English, but primarily English. English for the big conversations, to convey meaning, to enable understanding. German is the ‘learning language’ the one for light conversations, the one that’s vocabulary often gets unwittingly mixed into an English sentence with spectacular results.

I used to feel bad, sort of lazy or uneducated when people asked what language we spoke and my answer was ‘mostly English’, particularly when the inevitable reply of  ’you should speak German’ followed. But I am learning – always learning – that in an experience like this one, in a story like the one I am writing blind, there are no shoulds and shouldn’ts, there are no rules we should be beholden to. We can only do what works for us – and if that means under your relationship roof, you communicate in a common tongue that doesn’t necessarily match the country you are currently living in, then so be it. It’s no one else’s business.

THAT’S IN REAL LIFE

====> MHINE

Posted
2 years ago

Does anyone truly love to work?

Does anyone truly love to work?

I mean, the actual act of working, not the side-effects: satisfaction, sense of purpose, feelings of accomplishment. I mean, let’s be honest: wouldn’t you rather be having a glass of wine with friends in a nice, sunny garden instead of surveilling a parking garage, polishing your story draft, or pulling weeds? I know I would. But without the work hours, the wine hours feel a bit hollow and unearned. I mean, what to talk about between sips of wine, if not the day’s accomplishments? Besides which, if you don’t pull the weeds, the sunny garden tends to look a bit…weedy.

Maybe you’re different. Perhaps you’re actually one of those extremely driven souls who thrive on long days at the office, negotiating, litigating, or typing your heart out until moonglitter streams into the windows. If so, I commend you. But I don’t entirely trust you. What are you trying to avoid? Do you fear human engagement outside of the cubicle? I mean, what’s the work for, if not to find a sense of meaning inside a life that’s larger than the work itself—and by larger, I mean full of people, friendships, laughter, travel, feasts, and not a few glasses of wine?

I stumbled across a quotation in one of my favorite books this morning that seems to sum up what I’m feeling about my novel manuscript right now. I’ve sent her out into the world, and I tensely await the world’s feedback. Writing those 60,000-or-so words has taken many thousands of hours over a period of about two years. There were moments when I loved the actual hours of dreaming up words and sentences. And there were hours when dragging a single phrase out of the mental quagmire felt like a slog in swirling, waist-high water. And when I thumb through that stack of pages, I feel surges of emotion—pride and disgust, terror and thrill. To sum it up, love.

I mean, the actual act of working, not the side-effects: satisfaction, sense of purpose, feelings of accomplishment. I mean, let’s be honest: wouldn’t you rather be having a glass of wine with friends in a nice, sunny garden instead of surveilling a parking garage, polishing your story draft, or pulling weeds? I know I would. But without the work hours, the wine hours feel a bit hollow and unearned. I mean, what to talk about between sips of wine, if not the day’s accomplishments? Besides which, if you don’t pull the weeds, the sunny garden tends to look a bit…weedy.

Maybe you’re different. Perhaps you’re actually one of those extremely driven souls who thrive on long days at the office, negotiating, litigating, or typing your heart out until moonglitter streams into the windows. If so, I commend you. But I don’t entirely trust you. What are you trying to avoid? Do you fear human engagement outside of the cubicle? I mean, what’s the work for, if not to find a sense of meaning inside a life that’s larger than the work itself—and by larger, I mean full of people, friendships, laughter, travel, feasts, and not a few glasses of wine?

I stumbled across a quotation in one of my favorite books this morning that seems to sum up what I’m feeling about my novel manuscript right now. I’ve sent her out into the world, and I tensely await the world’s feedback. Writing those 60,000-or-so words has taken many thousands of hours over a period of about two years. There were moments when I loved the actual hours of dreaming up words and sentences. And there were hours when dragging a single phrase out of the mental quagmire felt like a slog in swirling, waist-high water. And when I thumb through that stack of pages, I feel surges of emotion—pride and disgust, terror and thrill. To sum it up, love.

My Preciousssssssss

Here’s Marlow, from Conrad’s Heart of Darkness, on the “twisted, ruined, tin-pot steamboat” he’s fighting to restore for his epic river journey:

“She was nothing so solid in make, and rather less pretty in shape, but I had expended enough hard work on her to make me love her. No influential friend would have served me better. She had given me a chance to come out a bit—to find out what I could do. No, I don’t like work. I had rather laze about and think of all the fine things that can be done. I don’t like work—no man does—but I like what is in the work,—the chance to find yourself. Your own reality—for yourself, not for others—what no other man can ever know.”

That pretty much sums it up. Which is why, as Hal put it earlier this morning, that 240-page stack makes me smile, even if the world, when all is said and done, declines to care about it with me.

I HEART BLOGGING    =============> MHINE

Posted
2 years ago

oh my god!!! i really loved this menu

Having a little one around, in particular one that seems to be, for the moment at least (fingers and toes resolutely crossed), enjoying the discovery of new foods, turns my thoughts to my own childhood food memories.  And, inevitably, to thoughts of recreating them for her.
Without even realizing, I have already started, as my childhood favorites have become adult favorites as well.  Monggo guisadoPancakesEgg salad. Pineapple Upside-down cakeSoft boiled eggs. Oatmeal.  CarbonaraCroquetas.  All have found their way, in some form or iteration, into this blog.
Other dishes are in my mind’s pipeline as well.  To be practiced, perfected, and chronicled here…and one day be served lovingly to little C, in the hopes that they, not only nourish her, but also live in the place where she keeps all her good memories.  My mom’s arroz caldo, that she fed me every time I was sick.  Her sopa seca, cocido, and carne frita.  Her “Royal Apahap”, proudly adapted from her well-worn copy of Nora Daza’s cookbook.  My grand-aunt’s apple pie.  My great grandmother’s, and my grandmother’s, dulce de leche (which we lovingly referred to as “toffee condensada”).  My grandmother’s pancit molo.
There is also this – the ubiquitous chicken curry of my childhood.
Filipino-style Chicken Curry
  • Canola oil
  • 700 grams – 1 kg chicken pieces (4 leg quarters, drumstick and thigh separated, or your own favorite parts)
  • 4 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 1 white onion, chopped
  • 2 potatoes (about 300-350 grams total weight), peeled and cubed
  • 1 big carrot or 2 smaller ones (about 200-250 grams total weight), peeled and cubed
  • 300 grams kamote tops (sweet potato leaves), leaves picked
  • 3-4 tablespoons curry powder (depending on how strong your curry powder is)
  • 400 ml coconut milk
  • 1-1/2 teaspoon salt, or to taste
  • 4 eggs
  • 4 strips bacon
  • 1/3 cup raisins
- Heat a pot over medium high heat.  Once hot, add a few glugs of oil, enough to coat the bottom of the pan.  When the oil is hot add the chicken.  Brown the chicken on all sides, no need to cook through, and set aside.
- Remove most of the oil from the pot but leave about spoonful in.  Make sure the oil is still hot then add the onions and garlic.  Sauté until the onion is soft and translucent.
- Add the potato and the carrot and toss.  Add the chicken back in the pot, sprinkle everything with the curry powder, and mix until everything is moist and coated in the curry.
- Add the coconut milk to the pot.  Stir then add the salt.  Stir again and cook, covered, for about 45 minutes to 1 hour, or until the chicken and all the vegetables are soft.  Make sure to check your pot occasionally during the cooking time, and give it a couple of stirs, to make sure your chicken doesn’t stick or your curry doesn’t scorch.  At 30 minute mark, add the kamote tops to the pot.  Taste and adjust seasoning.
- While you curry is cooking, hard boil the eggs, peel, chop finely, and set aside.  Fry your bacon crispy, drain on paper towels, chop/crush to bits.  Place raisins, chopped egg, and bacon bits in separate bowls.  These are your toppings.
- Serve curry with steaming white rice, toppings, and chutney.
Quirkily referred to Pinoy-style (or Filipino-style) chicken curry, this was a staple in many a childhood table, at least for my generation (and possibly before).  I have no clue if it has anything at all to do with Indian curry.  I don’t actually know if there is anything distinctly Filipino about it either.  It usually has strips of red pepper as well, but I didn’t have any on hand.  The addition of kamote tops (sweet potato leaves) is mine as I thought the curry would do well with the addition of some greens.  It is served, customarily, with chopped up hard-boiled egg, bacon bits, raisins, and chutney.
As I grew up, I left this dish at the wayside in favor of the more intense, authentic Indian curries and the vibrantly flavored Thai curries.  This was a relic, a kitschy leftover from the time when we used “curry powder”…a time when I was foolishly ignorant of such things as cumin, cardamom, fenugreek, cloves, coriander, turmeric, and how they could be put together in so many exciting ways.
I don’t know what urged me to try my hand at it – a sudden craving, a big jar of curry powder that my mum-in-law brought back for me from a trip to Singapore, or simply a new mum’s wistfulness to recreate the tastes of her childhood for her own child.  Whatever the case, I am glad I did.  The simple taste of this curry brought satisfaction in our tummies and smiles on our lips.
It seems like I have some catching up to do when it comes to trying my hand at my childhood favorites…but it is a task I am looking forward to it with relish!
***everytime i taste it, that was really awesome
                ====> MHINE
Posted
2 years ago